Thursday, November 29, 2018

Stuck Between Two Worlds




Waheguru ji ka Khalsa! Waheguru ji ki Fateh! Before I get started, I would like to note that everything written here are my own views and opinions and does not reflect anybody elses. Thank you. 

As the title states, I am stuck between two worlds. But first of all, hi! For those who are reading my blog for the first time, my name is Jasmine Morris (or as Sikhs know me, Gurpreet Kaur). I am an Amritdhari Sikh from Texas and you can read more about how I came into Sikhi to the right. Ont top of that, you can also discover how I became a Nihang Singhni in one of my previous blog posts down below. 

Now that we have gotten introductions out the way, we can get back to the topic at hand. So what exactly are the "Two Worlds" that I am stuck between? For me, it's the "mainstream" Sikh community and the Sikh Dharma community. As I hope everyone knows by now, not all non-Punjabi Sikhs are affliated or come to Sikhi through Sikh Dharma (or as some people like to refer to it as, 3HO). The same way there are a few Punjabis who are apart of 3HO. But of course people just find it easier to generalize. 😑

There are some things I've found troubling about both communities. I definately do not agree with some of the things Sikh Dharma teaches and does. The same way I do not agree with everything "traditional" Sikhs teach and do. But the segregation of the two communities is bad. Ever since becoming a Sikh, some Sikhs friends I know personally (Punjabi and non-Punjabi) have made it a point to purposely avoid those Sikhs in the white clothes and turbans. And on the flip side of things, I've noticed people who are apart of the Sikh Dharma community who do not interact with people outside of their group. There's valid reasons why people from both sides act this way but I won't expand on that. All I will say is this needs to stop!

I am not saying that ya'll cannot disagree with each other. But I am saying that there needs to be a healthy dialogue  (which, by the way, should not take place on social media). And there needs to be a move for integration so that one side can benefit from the other. Because yes, BOTH sides have some things going good for it that the other side needs. 

From my own personal experience, most (let's say, 90%) of the Sikhs apart of my circle here in Texas are immigrant Sikhs or non-Punjabi Sikhs not affliated to 3ho. The rest are Sikh Dharma. And I can say that disagreement and integration is possible. But of course if we are going to throw rocks and stones at each other like we all are not human, we're in trouble. REMEMBER, REMEMBER, REMEMBER that the SAME LIGHT that is in YOU is also in the person on the other side. Therefore, you should talk to them (whether irl or on social media) like God and Guru is present. 

Now so you might be asking why I choose the picture I did. No, it isn't clickbait lol. But the answer is simple. If  people with contrasting views such as Sant Jarnail Singh Bhindranwale, Yogi Bhajan, and Baba Nihal Singh can be in the same room together at the same time without falling out, the Sikh community can as well. 

Waheguru ji ka Khalsa! Waheguru ji ki Fateh! 

9 comments:

  1. Great initiative, Gurpreet. From my personal experience, I see at least one common factor among the members of two communities motioned in your blog post. The attitude towards a visitor is not very inviting. It is more like Matha-teko (bow and attend the congregation), Khao-Peo (eat langar), and Jao (go). There are very few exceptions to this rule. I think both communities need to see value (in terms of sikhi) in interacting with and helping visitors.

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    1. Basically, both communities can be insular (like you said).Which just leads raised suspicions of each other and lack of communication. That needs to change

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  2. But I wonder do sant jernail singh knew what yogi bhajan was doing behind the scenes

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    1. Honestly, I think all of them knew what each were doing behind the scenes. But there’s a time to make love, and there’s a time to make war. That’s the message I get from the picture

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  3. SSSJi BHAI Sahib Harbhajan Singh Khalsa, Panth Rattan, PHD (Yogiji) interacted with everyone, the homeless, politicians, Presidents, Popes, Arch Bishops, Munis, Imani, Rabbis, Priests, Military, educators, Spiritual Leaders, students, Teachers, men and women- he was not interested in political gain or power, he spent his 75 years serving, teaching and in meditation- a photo of a political Punjabi leader (Bhidranwale) and a Nihung Leader (Baba Nihal) was one man of Peace engaging two other Khalsa warriors!

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    1. First off, I don't believe in addressing spiritual leaders with long titles like that. I just call them by the name they are known by with Sikhs across the board. But then again, if you are affliated with SDI, you do you. Anyways, all of these men contributed something to the Sikh Panth, but at the same time, all of these men were humans. While it is important to look at the positive they brought to the world, it is also important to look at what mistakes they on this Earth. And I know that followers of all three leaders would kill me for saying that, but it's the truth.

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    2. *they made while on this Earth

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  4. My observation, american Sikhs probably practice on a much higher level than the average punjabi sikh. I think its best to evaluate people as individuals & not get caught up on what group.

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    1. You just contradicted your own statement (LOL). You say that it's best to evaluate people on an individual level (which I totally agree with). But then you make a statement generalizing all American Sikhs (which you need to define what you mean by "American") and Punjabi Sikhs.

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